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Trip aboard the Historic M/V J. S. Lewis

Page 2

 

General Layout

Approaching the J. S. Lewis, the most noticeable feature is the large pilothouse, surrounded by glass windows and sliding glass doors. One can't help but notice the brass spotlights, which were manufactured by Carlisle & Finch in 1951.

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Above, Capt. Steve Grossarth, Master aboard the M/V J. S. Lewis. The green enclosure at the forward end of the second deck surrounds the area that was once used as the coal hopper. It now serves as a VIP dining area.


The towboat is 155' long and has a breadth of 29.5'. She draws approximately eight feet of water, or "maybe 8 1/2 feet heavily loaded."


Starting at the bow on the main deck, there is an equipment storage area called the "Dog House" with vital safety equipment and items commonly used for going forward onto attached barges. These items include lifevests, crash axes, portable radios, portable navigation lighting, portable 2" pumps and a stretcher.


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Heading aft, there is a stairway to the 2nd deck on the starboard side, and to port, an entrance to an equipment room. This is one of the many areas that contains controls for the AC and DC electrical systems, as well as other sub-systems such as the pnuematic pressure vessels to operate the transmissions.


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Above, the freshly painted surfaces on the exterior hull of the J. S. Lewis. Below, electrical power distribution in the forward equipment area.

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Below, the pnuematic air tanks that store the charge needed to shift in and out of gear for the transmissions.

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Heading further aft, one finds the Chief Engineers workstation to starboard, along with the ships dual AC generators. There are two duplicate units, one for use and the other as a standby.

In the Engine Room, the engines were maintained in a surprisingly clean condition, especially considering their vintage. It was obvious throughout the boat that the company takes pride in maintaining its equipment. The engines ticked over at 225 RPMs at idle, giving a slight vibration that went throughout the boat and made for good sleeping at night.

The flywheel turned over so slowly that you could sometimes see its marks and imperfections. Mounted aft of the engines were the transmissions, then the shafts disappeared through a bulkhead and eventually toward the stern of the ship. The propellers, or wheels, on the Lewis are 4-bladed stainless steel, measuring 76" in diameter and 64" in pitch.


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Above, the cylinder heads of the 1958 Enterprise diesels. Below, a below-deck view of the port engine.

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Following are some interesting engine statistics:

  • Engine weight: 37,500 lbs.
  • Crankshaft: 8.5" diameter
  • 12" Bore, 15" Stroke
  • 750 hp. rated at 500 RPM
  • Displacement: 10,179 cu. in.
  • Max. Exhaust Gas Temp.: 920 deg. F
  • Cylinder Head: 400 lbs.
  • Piston: 150 lbs.
  • Connecting Rod: 120 lbs.
  • Valves: 3" diameter, 14" long, each 4 lbs.


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Above and below, the engine indications from one of the diesels, monitored by the engineer.

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Above, a view of the massive flywheel on the Enterprise diesel. Below, a view from below-decks of the massive exhaust manifold.

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