Home Blog Feedback






website security

 

 

 

Didga know?


Capt. "Even Keel" Jim Willis

(Expert historian in river lore and fun)

 

6 Mile Island is a National Preserve

The Kentucky State Nature Preserves Commission is the project manager over the preserve and was dedicated June 24, 1979. The reserve is an undeveloped, river surrounded island known for its extensive variety of waterbirds. Even though the preserve has a variety of birds, not many people visit the island as the only access is by boat. 6 Mile Island remains a popular beaching spot for overnighters and the island often explored by the boating community.


14 Mile Creek was formed when glaciated water flowed through the unglaciated stream valley.

It is lined by limestone cliffs, the area of 14-mile creek is noted for its karst sinkholes, hidden waterfalls, and small caves. Due to the damming of the Ohio River, much of the creek is of the same elevation as the river. In fact, the creek sometimes appears to be flowing upstream when in fact rising waters from the Ohio push into the creek.

Further upstream from the river, the creek is sometimes only a foot or two deep, which is why historically mills that used the creek had to use dams to keep a constant flow to run them. Bass, Bluegill and Catfish are the most common fish on the creek.

The creek has seen much history. It is known that the Talligewi Indian tribe resided here. Many local mills used Fourteen Mile Creek for power, most especially Tunnel Mill. The 1920-30's popular Rose Island Amusement was situated where the creek and the Ohio River meet.

In the 1700' the Talligewi Indians claimed the forks of the Ohio River Valley area who later formed into Alligewi and the river to Alligewi Sipu, or River of the Alligewi. The Allegewi Indians are sometimes said to have occupied the territory east of the Mississippi encompassing the Ohio River Valley and the area of many of its tributaries. Early maps of western PA sometimes are shown with the present day Allegheny River as the Ohio River-as the Indians and French often referred to the two as one continuous river.

Enjoying the Tiki Bar at Siegs Restaurant at Heathers on the River fuel dock, and looking across to the Indiana shore, one must wonder about the sights and sounds of 14 mile creek 300 year ago.


James Wood founded Utica Indiana

Between 1794-1825, Utica was a popular ferry crossing, as ferry crossings were considered too dangerous at Jeffersonville, due to inexperienced ferry operators and the Falls of the Ohio. James Noble Wood, the founder of Utica, was the first ferryman in the area, and he served as one of only a handful of territorial judges in "Indian Territory" during this period.

In recent years, Utica has experienced a rebirth of beautiful waterfront homes with amazing views overlooking the river.

 

 

 

Capt. Jim Willis
Paradigm Yacht Sales

Jim Willis has over 35 years of inland waterway boating experience having owned and operated a variety of cruisers and houseboats.

Jim brings 30+ years of corporate management and customer service expertise to Paradigm Yacht Sales, along with his passion for life on the water and boating. He and his wife Mary Pat have lived aboard and served as an inland waterway delivery captain, bringing a unique understanding of the needs and issues of recreational boaters.

Having owned and operated boats up to 70', Jim enjoys sharing his experiences and guidance to the boating community. His credentials include the USCG Captains License (Master 100 GRT), a BS in Economics from Indiana University and an MBA from the University of Indianapolis.

Jim and his family live along the banks of the Ohio River and he works primarily from the Paradigm Louisville office.

jim@paradigmyachts.com

 

This article was contributed to this site by Paradigm Yacht Sales, Louisville's largest brokerage.

Whether you're looking to buy or sell a boat, you can reach them at:

Paradigm Yacht Sales
P.O. Box 1043
US Highway 42
Prospect, KY 40059

877-468-7594 Toll Free
502-292-0444
Fax: 502-292-0442

 

 

©2014 BoatLocal.com